How to get a Copy of Your Credit Report

Get a Copy of Your Credit Report

When trying to recover financially it is important to review your credit report and make sure there are no errors impacting your credit score. The Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act requires each of the credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months.

 

You may order your credit report from www.annualcreditreport.com. This is the only online source authorized to do so. Beware of other sites that may look and sound similar.

Debt Repayment Plans

 

If your financial difficulties arise from too much debt or an inability to repay your debts, a credit counseling agency may work out a debt repayment plan for you. In these plans, you deposit money each month with the credit counseling agency. Your deposits are used to pay your creditors according to a payment schedule the counselor develops with you.

 

As part of the repayment plan, you may have to agree not to apply for — or use — any additional credit while you’re participating in the program. A successful repayment plan requires you to make regular, timely payments, and could take 48 months or longer to complete. Some credit counseling agencies charge little or nothing for managing the plan; others charge a monthly fee that could add up to a significant charge over time.

 

A debt repayment plan does not erase your credit history. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, accurate information about your accounts can stay on your credit report for up to seven years. A bankruptcy can stay on your report for ten years. In addition, your creditors will continue to report information about accounts that are handled through a debt repayment plan. For example, creditors may report that an account is in financial counseling, that payments have been missed, or that there are write-offs or other concessions. But a demonstrated pattern of timely payments should help you get credit in the future.

 

Your debts are either secured or unsecured. Secured debts usually are tied to an asset, like your car for a car loan, or your house for a mortgage. If you stop making payments, the lender can repossess your car or foreclose on your house. Unsecured debts are not tied to any asset. Examples include most credit card debt, bills for medical care, signature loans and debts for other types of services. Debt repayment plans usually cover only your unsecured debt. If your secured debts are not included in the plan, you must continue to make payments to these creditors directly.

 

 

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